What Would the Geek do to Troubleshoot VoIP Call Quality Issues?

What Would the Geek do to Troubleshoot VoIP Call Quality Issues?

You'd think at this point with Voiceover IP, as admins, we'd have figured out
how to keep users happy with call quality. But while users have accepted
lower quality calls on their mobile phones, they still expect interoffice connections that sound like switch copper pots. And that's not fair considering
how much money we save with VoIP, but the preconception about what good is
goes all the way back to Ma Bell. M.O.S., or Mean Opinion Score, was once measured by human ears
at the phone company. Teams of operators would silently
drop in on your calls and subjectively rank call quality
on a scale of 1-5. We were concerned about echo, sound level, and static back then, but today we worry more about latency and jitter.

But it was a great way
for telcos to ensure quality. With VoIP, M.O.S. is objectively measured by the call infrastructure itself to roughly approximate
how a human would rank the call. And the great news with VoIP is that
the call systems that you already have probably collect everything you need to troubleshoot many call quality issues on your network.

First, your call managers
already log every call and depending on the vendor, those logs can contain detailed metrics. They're probably using the IP phones
and gateways and sensors in effect. These logs are called CDRs,
or Call Detail Records, and can easily be analyzed by VoIP
monitoring systems. Second, some routers and switches
provide built-in voice-specific call simulation that can actively test your VoIP call paths 24×7. They're a little trickier to set up,
but again, your VoIP monitoring systems can often manage that for you.

And last, VoIP piggybacks on routed networks which usually have asymmetric bandwidth. That plus converged application traffic can create lots of jitter
no matter how fat the pipe. And overworked routers and unnecessary hops
are also a common source of latency, or worse, dropped packets. In those cases, your Network Performance Monitor can be a big help. As a first step, consider at least basic QoS tagging and better active traffic shaping, especially for video and executive telepresence. A good policy map can prioritize jitter
and latency-sensitive traffic and make a world of difference,
especially for those pesky humans who make calls on our networks. If you're seeing too many
VoIP-related help desk tickets, and you'd like to try SolarWinds NPM®
and VoIP monitoring in your network, visit www.solarwinds.com
and download a free copy today..

VoIP (voice over internet protocol) over the internet, compared to VoIP over private networks.

VoIP (voice over internet protocol) over the internet, compared to VoIP over private networks.

VoIP (voice over internet protocol) over the internet, compared to VoIP over private networks. Hello, I’m Rachael Ruble with FiberLine Communications. Thank you for joining us for this discussion about VoIP (voice over internet protocol) over the internet, compared to VoIP over private networks. VoIP (voice over internet protocol) voice traffic can be transmitted over the public internet, across the secure network of a telecom provider, or via the private MPLS network of a multi-location business. VoIP over the public internet has its limitations because CoS (Class of Service) packet prioritization cannot be enforced on the public internet.

The result of this is that voice traffic is competing with all other internet traffic throughout its journey across the public internet. Lack of CoS packet prioritization can often result in latency and packet loss. High latency and packet loss often result in poor call quality. Latency and packet loss are virtually non-existent with VoIP over the private networks of telecom providers. With this option, the provider keeps all voice traffic on their private network, until this traffic reaches the PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network). This allows the provider to utilize CoS packet prioritization to ensure that voice traffic receives top priority; and more routine, less latency sensitive applications receive lower priority. The result is virtually perfect call quality. All major telecom providers now routinely utilize VoIP technology for voice traffic. With VoIP over the private MPLS (Multiprotocol label
switching) network of a multi-location business, CoS is ensured by the provider, so call quality is excellent in these situations as well. An advantage for businesses with VoIP over an MPLS network is that all location-to-location calls within each network, regardless of distance, are free. This includes international calls over an international MPLS network.

Thank you for joining us for this discussion. If you have questions, or if you would like a free consultation with one of our certified engineers, please give us a call, or use the contact form on our website. A link to our website is located immediately below this video. If you would like to watch other videos which address related topics, please click on one of these green links. Or, click the link to our website, directly beneath this video to use our patented real-time pricing tool. This pricing tool is easy to use, and there is no obligation.

Our pricing tool will assist you in checking prices and availability, for any business telecom service for your business location, including: T1, Ethernet, Fiber, Voice, VOIP, larger circuits
like DS3, Fast E or Gig E, or networking between business
locations, for any location in the United States, or, international networks, please visit our website at www.Fiberlinecommunications.com. I’m Jody Ellen, the Director of Training here at FiberLine
Communications. Thank you for joining us today for this training
session..